Skip to main content

Arthur I. Boreman (1823-1896) Papers

 Collection
Collection Number: A&M.0104

Scope and Contents

Personal and business papers of lawyer, U.S. Senator, circuit court judge, and first Governor of West Virginia, Arthur I. Boreman. Includes correspondence and legal and financial documents. Correspondence includes letters to and from Arthur's brother Jacob Boreman, as well as Francis H. Pierpont and George W. Summers. There are also letters and other documents relating to the taking and exchanging of hostages by the West Virginia government during the Civil War.

Series 1. Correspondence -- Boreman, Arthur I.; 1861-1895, undated; box 1, folders 1-4. The correspondence includes letters from Arthur Boreman to his brother Jacob in Kansas City, Missouri, which are generally personal but which also include numerous statements regarding political events in West Virginia; a letter from Boreman to George Summers, a prominent politician of western Virginia; and letters between Boreman and Francis H. Pierpont, governor of the Restored Government of Virginia during the Civil War. These letters are entirely political and discuss important events in West Virginia's history.

Series 2. Papers -- Boreman, Arthur I.; 1868-1888; box 1, folders 5-7. This series includes miscellaneous papers, financial and business papers, and Ku Klux Klan letter and clippings. The financial and business papers relate to Boreman's property and business in Parkersburg, West Virginia, and are of a routine nature. The KKK items include a photostat letter from the Nicholas County, West Virginia, KKK, threatening Governor Boreman (1868), and photostat clippings regarding KKK threats to other local public figures (1868).

Series 3. Hostage Letters; 1863-1865, undated; box 1, folders 8-21. This series includes documents and correspondence relating to the taking and exchanging of hostages by the West Virginia government during the Civil War. The hostages were taken in retaliation for captives taken by Confederate guerrillas during raids on Union-held territory in the state. These papers include testimony from private citizens regarding the Confederate sympathies of their neighbors; warrants for the arrest as hostages of citizens with Confederate sympathies; notes to be carried by hostages to Richmond, Virginia, requesting the release of Union captives; and letters from friends of hostages asking for their release. One of this last group is a letter to Boreman from David Hunter Strother.

See also the Calendar of the Arthur I. Boreman Letters in the State Department of Archives and History (link in External Documents).

Contents List:

Series 1. Correspondence -- Boreman, Arthur I.

Box 1; Folder 1; A.I. Boreman Papers - 1946 accession (4 items); Autograph letter signed. From F.H. Pierpont, Richmond, to Governor Boreman, Wheeling. Marked "Private Again" at top of sheet; Pierpont advises Boreman to have legislation passed establishing a sinking fund to pay West Virginia's share of the Virginia state debt; advises him further to pay off West Virginia's share by buying Virginia bonds at depreciated values; comments on the deteriorating situation in Virginia's state government. With envelope.; 19 December 1866

Box 1; Folder 1; A.I. Boreman Papers - 1946 accession (cont.); Typescript letter signed. From Henry J. Johnson, Corresponding Secretary of the Society of the Army of West Virginia, Cumberland, MD, to Mrs. Pierpont; 23 September 1884

Box 1; Folder 1; A.I. Boreman Papers - 1946 accession (cont.); Envelope (War Department stationery) addressed to Boreman (This envelope is not meant to be in this folder--it probably belongs with one of the hostage letters in Series 3).; 27 July [no year]

Box 1; Folder 1; A.I. Boreman Papers - 1946 accession (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Parkersburg, West Virginia, to Colonel T.F. Lang, Baltimore. Acknowledges receipt of a copy of "Loyal West Virginia" and makes corrections on one part of the history of the formation of the state, that of the exact date of Boreman's inauguration and the circumstances and date of Governor Pierpont's removal of the Restored Government of Virginia to Alexandria.; 3 October 1895

Box 1; Folder 2; A.I. Boreman - F.H. Pierpont Letters (2 items); Autograph letter signed. From F.H. Pierpont, Alexandria, Virginia, to Governor Boreman, [Wheeling]. Discusses return of a man named Thompson (possibly a hostage taken for return of Union men captured in raids) to Virginia - Pierpont wants him returned to spare himself further expense and anxiety in a suit brought against him by Thompson; discusses weakness in Lincoln's administration of the war and of General Grant's command; mentions his financial difficulties as a result of three years dedication to the Restored Government of Virginia.; 18 May 1864

Box 1; Folder 2; A.I. Boreman - F.H. Pierpont Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From F.H. Pierpont, Fairmont, West Virginia, to A.I. Boreman, [Washington]. Discusses the case of a claim for an unpaid voucher for horse care during the war; advises Boreman to vote against the treaty which includes the warship "Alabama" claims by the British; voices his opinions on General Grant's presidential administration - finds Grant's administration the weakest the U.S. government has ever seen and lists his reasons for believing that; fears Grant's enforcement act will ruin the party.; 18 May 1872

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (13 items); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Discusses the pros and cons of A.I.'s upcoming marriage.; 16 November 1864

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, Kansas City, Missouri. More on A.I.'s marriage; discusses prospects of outlawing slavery in Maryland, West Virginia, and Missouri; hopes that other states will follow suit and that slavery will soon be gone forever from the United States. With envelope.; 15 December 1864

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Congratulates Jacob on his appointment to judiciary; asks to be sent a copy of the new Missouri constitution; discusses the difficulties of a political life, especially with regard to its financial insecurity; asks about investment opportunities in Missouri; asks about the possibilities of selling land warrants in Kansas City for the endowment of a West Virginia Agricultural College; discusses the difficult situation of a returning rebel in West Virginia.; 12 May 1865

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Marked Private at head of letter; discusses the fight for the adoption of an amendment to the West Virginia constitution disfranchising rebels and making them ineligible for public office; declares his amazement at the extent of opposition to it and claims nearly all the wealth of the state, and a large part of the ability are against it; feels confident it will pass, however; advises Jacob on his upcoming marriage.; 14 May 1866

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Discusses A.I.'s expectations that he will be renominated for governor of West Virginia; mentions the burning of his storehouse in Parkersburg with the accompanying loss of three or four thousand dollars; hopes Missouri will be carried by the "Radicals"; has fears for Maryland in the election and is concerned with the influence of the Blairs of Maryland on the President; mentions his lobbying effort with Senator Van Winkle to have a Kansas railway bill passed; notes the passage of the amendment to disfranchise rebels by a substantial majority; warns Jacob of potential unpleasantness if he visits Parkersburg because of the rebel politics of some family friends.; 26 June 1866

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri].; 15 September 1866

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Discusses party politics in West Virginia and new federal financial policies, including A.I.'s disapproval of W. McCulloch's policy of contracting the currency.; 25 November 1867

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Washington, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Advises brother on his interest in the newspaper business; discusses difficulties presented by the rebel suffrage question at the new state constitutional convention; presents his opinions of Senator Schurz of Missouri, especially of his positions on reconstruction, and his tendency to philosophize rather than be practical; comments on the healthy growth and prosperity of Kansas City; discusses the financial success of their brothers and wishes the one worst off would go to Kansas where he could make a good living for his family; describes the successes of his life with satisfaction; asks Jacob to destroy the letter.; 29 May 1870

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Washington, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Describes progress in securing a political appointment for Jacob; advises Jacob to pursue other business and not count on political appointments; cannot understand how he can be having financial difficulties in such a prosperous country [the West]; laments his own ill health and financial insecurities.; 8 May 1872

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Washington, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Asks Jacob to send no more recommendations - he has enough to show the President that Missouri Republicans endorse his application for a judicial appointment; he will receive the next vacancy but A.I. cannot guarantee when that will be.; 20 May 1872

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Washington, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Advises Jacob not to count on an early appointment; expects he will receive the first available, but cannot tell when that will be; sends copies of Congressional Globes for Jacob's information.; 31 May 1872

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Parkersburg, WV, to Jacob Boreman, [Kansas City, Missouri]. Discusses financial affairs of their brother Thomas; A. I. mentions he is checking on the Colorado judgeship for Jacob; notes Republican victory in West Virginia for Grant and Wilson; wonders whether Democratic Party is in as great a disarray as seems - if so the Republicans may hold the state, but fears the Democrats' "powers of cohesion and recuperation" may win out; regrets the Republicans did not carry Missouri; fears Frank Blair will be reelected to the Senate from Missouri; wonders whether they might do something to prevent that, but reconsiders that at least Blair will only damage his own party as a Senator and is really better in that respect than other Democrats might be.; 20 November 1872

Box 1; Folder 3; A.I. Boreman - Jacob Boreman Letters (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Parkersburg, WV, to Jacob Boreman, [no location]. Mentions his hard work in court this term; discusses the work Jacob has been doing on their genealogy; mentions his hope that he may write some family history; asks Jacob about a conflict over the seating of delegates at Utah's constitutional convention; is concerned about which party, Republican or Democrat, or even Populist of Silver men, will represent Utah in the Senate; hopes it will fall to the Republicans, but guesses the Democrats expect to gain control or the Democratic U.S. Congress would not have admitted the state; gives his opinion of Stephen B. Elkins, rating him a "good and useful citizen" after describing the business activities of Elkins in West Virginia; expresses concern that the Republicans may lose control of West Virginia; notes the importance the silver question will have in the 1896 Presidential campaign.; April 1895

Box 1; Folder 4; A.I. Boreman - Other Correspondence (4 items); Autograph letter signed. From A.I. Boreman, Richmond, to George W. Summers, [no location]. Letter marked "private & confidential"; expresses Boreman's deep concern about the crisis looming in the country at the time; mentions the upcoming Virginia state convention at which the secession question will be considered; asks Summers to become a candidate for delegate to the convention; Boreman expresses his fear that if the U.S. Government fails, the best government in the world will have failed and the only chance for real freedom will be gone; the future will be "impenetrable gloom."; 15 January 1861

Box 1; Folder 4; A.I. Boreman - Other Correspondence (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From William P. Rucker, Marrietta, Ohio, to Governor A.I. Boreman, [Wheeling]. Thanks Boreman for getting him out of rebel prison, where he had been taken after a raid; offers his services to lead a raid to disrupt rebel railroads and telegraph facilities in southwestern Virginia, release Union prisoners in Lynchburg and Danville, and destroy Confederate specie and supplies stored there; wants sufficient protection for himself and the men he would need and a commission with which to provide for his family; asks Governor Boreman's influence with military planners in Washington in getting his plan accepted.; 27 November 1863

Box 1; Folder 4; A.I. Boreman - Other Correspondence (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From three Convention Committee members, Wheeling, WV, to Honorable A.I. Boreman, Wheeling, WV. Officially informs Boreman that he has been nominated by the convention for the office of Governor of West Virginia.; 6 August 1864

Box 1; Folder 4; A.I. Boreman - Other Correspondence (cont.); Autograph letter signed. From R.G. Bass, Wheeling, to Colonel H.W. Crothers, Wellsburg, WV. Regarding an outstanding order involving Governor Boreman.; 16 June 1869

Series 2. Papers -- Boreman, Arthur I.

Box 1; Folder 5; A.I. Boreman - Miscellaneous Papers (contains Boreman's commission as Judge of the 5th Judicial Circuit of West Virginia with original envelope [1888], and a manuscript copy of Boreman's address at a memorial for President U.S. Grant [1885]; 3 items); 1885-1888

Box 1; Folder 6; A.I. Boreman - Personal Business and Financial Papers (includes a bank book, checks, invoices, a deed, a promissory note to Boreman from J.H. Diss Debar [5 March 1869], and other items; 25 items); 1869-1888

Box 1; Folder 7; Ku Klux Klan Letter and Clippings (includes a photostat of a letter from the Nicholas County, West Virginia, Ku Klux Klan, threatening Governor Boreman's life if he refuses to remove the present Board of Voter Registration for that county, which was denying the franchise to former Rebels; and copies of several clippings regarding Ku Klux Klan threats to other local public figures; 2 items; missing); 1868

Series 3. Hostage Letters

Box 1; Folder 8; Hostage Letters - Barbour County (10 items); 1863

Box 1; Folder 9; Hostage Letters - Braxton County (includes originals and one typescript copy; 12 items); 1863-1864

Box 1; Folder 10; Hostage Letters - Cabell and Wayne Counties (3 items); 1864, undated

Box 1; Folder 11; Hostage Letters - Doddridge County (15 items); 1863-1864, undated

Box 1; Folder 12; Hostage Letters - Gilmer County (8 items); 1863-1864

Box 1; Folder 13; Hostage Letters - Greenbrier County (1 item); 1864

Box 1; Folder 14; Hostage Letters - Hardy and Hampshire Counties (10 items); 1863-1864, undated

Box 1; Folder 15; Hostage Letters - Mason and Putnam Counties (2 items); 1864

Box 1; Folder 16; Hostage Letters - Morgan County (16 items); 1864, undated

Box 1; Folder 17; Hostage Letters - Morgan County - D.H. Strother Letter (original and photostat copy; 2 items); 1864

Box 1; Folder 18; Hostage Letters - Nicholas County (2 items); 1863

Box 1; Folder 19; Hostage Letters - Pendleton County (3 items); 1863

Box 1; Folder 20; Hostage Letters - Randolph County (8 items); 1863-1864, undated

Box 1; Folder 21; Hostage Letters - Miscellaneous (1 item); 1865

Dates

  • 1861-1895, undated

Creator

Language of Materials

English

Conditions Governing Access

No special access restriction applies.

Conditions Governing Use

Permission to publish or reproduce is required from the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the West Virginia and Regional History Center.

Biographical / Historical

Arthur Ingraham Boreman (1823-1896) was born in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, then moved with his family to Virginia where he was educated and read law with his older brother William I. Boreman. He was admitted to the Bar in 1843, and soon after located in Parkersburg, (West) Virginia, where he lived for the rest of his life. He was elected to the Virginia Legislature from Wood County in 1855 and served until 1861. Boreman began his political career as a member of the Whig Party, but he became a Republican when that party organized and remained a Republican until his death.

In 1861, after Virginia voted to secede from the Union, Boreman presided over the Wheeling Convention that organized the Restored Government of Virginia. In October of that year, he was elected Judge of the Parkersburg district Circuit Court and remained in that office until 1863, when he was elected Governor of the new State of West Virginia. He was reelected to that office twice, serving as Governor from 1863 to 1869. On November 30, 1864, he married Laurane Tanner Bullock (1830-1908).

In 1869, Boreman resigned his office as Governor to run for the U.S. Senate. He was elected and served for one term, till 1875. In 1875, he retired from government duties and reestablished a successful law practice in Parkersburg. Without his solicitation, however, he was once again elected Judge of the Parkersburg district he had served from 1861 to 1863, serving again from 1889-1896. He remained in that position until his death.

Extent

0.25 Linear Feet (Summary: 2 1/2 in. (1 document case))

Overview

Personal and business papers of lawyer, U.S. Senator, circuit court judge, and first Governor of West Virginia, Arthur I. Boreman. Includes correspondence and legal and financial documents. Correspondence includes letters to and from Arthur's brother Jacob Boreman, as well as Francis H. Pierpont and George W. Summers. There are also letters and other documents relating to the taking and exchanging of hostages by the West Virginia government during the Civil War. See Scope and Content Note for more details and contents list. See Historical Note for more information about Boreman.

Physical Location

West Virginia and Regional History Center / West Virginia University / 1549 University Avenue / P.O. Box 6069 / Morgantown, WV 26506-6069 / Phone: 304-293-3536 / Fax: 304-293-3981 / URL: https://wvrhc.lib.wvu.edu/

Related A&M Collections

104, 639
Title
Arthur I. Boreman (1823-1896) Papers, 1861-1895, undated
Author
Staff of the West Virginia & Regional History Center
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the West Virginia and Regional History Center Repository

Contact:
1549 University Ave.
P.O. Box 6069
Morgantown WV 26506-6069 US
304-293-3536